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Murder of Nigerian: South African court grants 8 alleged killer-cops bail

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Murder of Nigerian: South African court grants 8 alleged killer-cops bail

The eight South African police officers arrested in connection with alleged brutal murder of a Nigerian in 2017 have been released on bail by that country’s Magistrate Court.

Adetola Olubajo, President of the Nigerian Union in South Africa (NUSA), confirmed the latest development to the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on telephone from Pretoria on Monday.

Olubajo said that South Africa’s Independent Police Investigating Directorate (IPID) had indicted the eight cops for the torture and murder of Mr Badmus Olalekan Ibrahim on Oct. 10, 2017.

“The eight police officers (six men and two women) were released Monday on bail of R3,000 (about N72,000) each among other conditions by the Vanderbijlpark Magistrate Court.

“One of the bail conditions is that the released police officers should not in any way interfere with witnesses.

“The eight police officers made application for bail at the magistrate court today (Oct. 8) with three lawyers representing them,” he told NAN.

Olubajo said that IPID, an independent unit outside the South African Police Department, had opposed the bail application through the IPID Principal Investigating Officer, Mr Tulani Makagula.

Read also: Burundi head teacher gets 5-year term

He said the magistrate granted the wish of the defendants and adjourned the matter until Nov. 13 for further hearing.

“The court premises and room were filled with members of the Police and Prisons Civil Rights Union, who were in solidarity with their members indicted for torture and murder of Ibrahim.

“The police union have thrown their weight behind their accused members, pledging legal support for them.

According to unofficial sources, up to 800,000 Nigerians mostly young people reside in South Africa.

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Africa’s ‘youngest billionaire’ Dewji abducted in Tanzania

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Africa’s ‘youngest billionaire’ Dewji abducted in Tanzania

The man said to be Africa’s youngest billionaire has been kidnapped by masked gunmen in Tanzania’s main city Dar es Salaam, police say.

Mohammed Dewji, 43, was abducted outside a swanky hotel gym where he was going for his routine morning workout.

Three people have been arrested in connection with the incident and two of the abductors were believed to be foreign nationals, police added.

The motive for Mr Dewji’s abduction is still unclear.

Financial magazine Forbes puts his wealth at $1.5bn (£980m), and has described him as Tanzania’s only billionaire.

In a 2017 report, it said Mr Dewji was Africa’s youngest billionaire.

Mr Dewji is also a major sponsor of one of Tanzania’s biggest football teams, Simba.

He promised in 2016 to donate at least half his fortune to philanthropic causes, Forbes said.

Read also: Interpol bursts criminal networks, rescues 85 Europe-bound child slaves in Sudan

Mr Dewji, locally known as Mo, is credited with turning his family business from a wholesale and retail enterprise into a pan-African conglomerate, reports the BBC’s Athuman Mtulya from Dar es Salaam.

His company, METL, has interests in textile manufacturing, flour milling, beverages and edible oils in at least six African states.

Mr Dewji served as a ruling party MP for a decade until 2015. He told the BBC in a 2014 interview that this possibly made it easier for him to meet top politicians, but it did not give him an unfair advantage, as other businessmen also had access to them.

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‘I felt the bus swerve from one side to the other.’ How 55 people died in Kenya bus crash

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Fifty-five people were killed when their bus left the road, rolled down a slope and crashed in western Kenya, an official said Wednesday, with the roof of the bus ripped off.

“The information we have is that the driver lost control,” Kericho County police commander James Mugera told The Associated Press.

“I felt the bus swerve from one side to the other and then I found myself in the middle of nowhere,” passenger Joseph Obonyo told the AP. “There was a body near me and people were being thrown out of the bus, flying out of it like airplanes, and where we were thrown that was it. … I am only able to say that God saved me and I am truly thankful.”

The bus had been traveling from the capital, Nairobi, to the western town of Kakamega when the accident occurred around 4 a.m., Rift Valley regional police boss Francis Munyambu said.

Read also: Interpol bursts criminal networks, rescues 85 Europe-bound child slaves in Sudan

The bus was not licensed to operate at night and its owners will face charges, regional traffic police boss Zero Arome said. “It is very unfortunate what has happened and action will be taken,” he said.

According to government statistics, around 3,000 Kenyans die every year in road accidents. In the 2015 Global Status Report on Road Safety, the World Health Organization said Kenyan roads are among the most dangerous in the world, claiming around 29.1 lives per 100,000 people.

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Zulu King seeks guarantees that ‘land of the Zulus will not be touched’

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Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini has said he wants South Africa’s president to guarantee that his territories will be exempt from forthcoming land reforms.

“The president… must tell us and then sign an agreement that the land of the Zulus will not be touched,” he said, speaking at the annual Shaka Day celebration in Durban.

The king controls 2.8 million hectares of land through a corporate entity called the Ingonyama Trust.

Read also: Interpol bursts criminal networks, rescues 85 Europe-bound child slaves in Sudan

In August, President Cyril Ramaphosa made the controversial announcement that South Africa’s constitution would be changed to explicitly allow for the expropriation of land without compensation.

Land reforms were first promised when white-minority rule ended in South Africa in 1994.

White people, who make up just 9% of the population, own 72% of the farmland that is held by individuals, government figures show.

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